“O Captain! My Captain!” Group Precis

Hi folks! Today, you are creating a group precis in groups.

Weekend Deadlines:

Midnight tonight: all questions posted on Google Doc #2

Midnight Sunday: all answers posted on Google Doc #2

For Monday: read and annotate the first two poems in your Socratic Poetry Packet.

For Monday: Socratic leaders, read and annotate. Remember you also need to create questions on a Google Doc and share them with your teacher.

 

How to Write a Poetic Precis

Hi folks! Today, you’re going to learn how to write a precis. This list of rhetorically accurate verbs will help as well.

Before you leave class, make sure you know these important due dates (Mrs. Keskes’ class):

By midnight tonight: 

  • Google Discussion #1 (all questions posted)

By midnight Sunday:

  • Google Discussion #1 (all questions answered)

By midnight Monday:

  • Typed precis to “An Author to Her Book” (submit on Google Classroom)

 

Precis Review

 

To continue preparing you for the midterm, let’s review one of the first elements of writing an analysis essay we taught you: the precis introduction.

Now, let’s put these skills to the test by applying them to the prose passage, “Cherry Bomb.”

We’ll be reading, annotating, charting, and writing a precis for the passage.

When you are done with your precis, you will pass them around the room so you can read multiple examples.

Comparison Poetry Essay

Hi folks!  Before we start comparison poetry, we need to select novels and groups for our Existential Literature Circle.

Now, let’s do a transition exercise with our 1984 essays (this is a skill we could all use practice with).

For the remainder of today, we’re going to read, annotate, and discuss AP poetry prompts which require you to write an essay comparing two poems.

This handout will help you with how to organize the essay: Comparative Poetry Handout

More poetry comparison practice tomorrow!

Precis Editing and Multiple Choice Strategies

Hi class!  To start, I’d like you to take out the precis you wrote on yesterday’s poem.  Exchange it with a classmate and have them peer edit, using the handout as a guide.

When you peer edit, feel free to make notations directly on the precis.

At your tables, select one precis to share with the class and write it on a whiteboard.  Make sure the group agrees that it is perfect.  We will share and discuss these as a class.

For the remainder of the week, we are going to focus on multiple choice strategies.  I’m going to give you a short packet which provides ideas for how to tackle the multiple choice section.  Read it tonight for homework and bring any questions you have about it tomorrow.

In the packet is a chart of four types of questions you’ll find in both prose and poetry.  To help familiarize yourself with the question types, you’ll be developing your own questions for a prose and a poetry passage.

The prose passage is a passage from Joyce Carol Oate’s We Were the Mulvaneys.  Read it, trying out the strategies suggested in the packet.  Then, with a partner, get four index cards.  On each card, write a question in the style of the AP exam.  There are four styles of questions.  You should have one of each, being sure to utilize the diction provided in the charts. On the back of the index card, you should write the answer and your rationale for the answer.  

The poetry passage is “It Sifts from Leaden Sieves” by Emily Dickinson.  The activity is the same as above.

Turn in all eight of your cards to Mrs. Keskes.  We will use them to quiz the class.

 

AP Midterm Review: Overview and Precis Format

Welcome back, students!  We hope you had a fantastic break!

It’s hard to believe, but there are just ten days until your midterm.  We’ll be spending those days preparing you as best we can.

The midterm for this class is a mini version of the AP exam.  Here’s an overview:

The actual AP exam consists of the following:

60 minutes: multiple choice questions (45-60 questions on 4-5 passages: both poetry and prose from a variety of time periods)

Your midterm:

45 minutes: multiple choice questions (30-45 questions on 3-4 passages: both poetry and prose from a variety of time periods)

The actual AP exam consists of the following:

2 hours: 3 essay questions (one close analysis of a poem, one close analysis of a prose passage, one open-response to a given prompt on an entire text of your choosing: remember your top 5!)

Your midterm:

40 minutes: 1 essay question (one close analysis of a poem OR one close analysis of a prose passage)

The actual AP exam is 3 hours long.  Your midterm is 85 minutes long.  

Your midterm will be graded using the AP grading scale, then converted to a letter grade for your report card.

You will get a detailed sheet breaking down and explaining your score after the midterm.

Now, to start preparing you for the midterm, let’s review one of the first elements of writing an analysis essay we taught you: the precis introduction.

Now, let’s put these skills to the test by applying them to a poem.  Before we do, let’s review as a class what meaningful annotation looks like.

Now, read “Crossing the Swamp” by Mary Oliver and take ten minutes to annotate silently.

Now that you’ve read and annotated the poem, take the rest of class to write a precis for it.  If you don’t finish in class, finish it for homework.  You will need it for tomorrow’s activities.